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Macbeth Freewill and Faith - William Shakespeare

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The play Macbeth written by William Shakespeare, the events in his life do not occur from supernatural powers such as fate, but from the decisions he came up with himself. The poor decisions that essentially lead up to Macbeth's death are the murder of King Duncan, his ignorance to the predictions that the weird sisters give him and he takes it a step further by nurdering innocent people. These choices were wrong and by making these poor decisions he slowly kills himself.

The ambition of becoming king, when the weird sisters tell him his fortune is stronger than his conscience and ability from knowing right from wrong. The first thought in his mind when the weird sisters tell him his great fortune of becoming king, is to kill king Duncan to take his place. "Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair and make my seated heart knock at my ribs, against the use of nature?"(I, iii, 145-148) The sisters never tell him he has to brutally murder the king in order to become king, but it is Macbeth's first thought in his mind. He debates with himself over the idea of killing the king, and then chooses to listen to his wife, who wants him to be king as much as he does. " Wouldst thou have that which thou esteem'st the ornament of life and live a coward in thin own esteem...(I, vii, 44-46) He chooses to listen to her put him down and call him a coward, when he has just come back from a war where he has killed hundreds of people. Macbeth has killed many people, but he is the one who does not defend him and let's him become persuaded by Lady Macbeth. His ambition of becoming king drove him to stab king Duncan. Macbeth wants to be king more than anything in the world, more then sleep or emotion and gives it all up to become king. To be an ambitious man is a good thing, but when ambition leads to ignorance of other people it does not only damage the people you are hurting but as well as yourself.

Knowing too much about the future can always distort a person. Macbeth knew too much about his future, but did not understand how to interpret the prophecies. He interprets the predictions the wrong way and slowly takes another step into his grave. Macbeth makes a huge error when he discovers that a man who isn't born by woman cannot kill him. "Be bloody, bold and resolute; laugh to scorn the power of man, for none woman born shall harm Macbeth."(IV,i 85-87). Every man is born from a woman but he does not take caesarean section into consideration. Thinking that he is indestructible he also thinks that Banqou's sons will not become king. " Macbeth shall live, the lease of nature pay his breath to time and mortal custom." (IV, iii, 107-109). Of course no one under any circumstances can be invincible. The thought of being unstoppable goes to Macbeth's head and begins to mock everyone. "Here is ten thousand"..."Geese, villains?" (V, iii, 13-14). He is

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