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Amazon Interview Questions

Essay by   •  October 23, 2017  •  Study Guide  •  8,731 Words (35 Pages)  •  1,200 Views

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Amazon Interview Questions

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

My greatest strength is that I’m a hard worker and I also have a strong work ethic. I’m committed to doing whatever it takes to meet deadlines. In fact, I prefer to complete the project well ahead of schedule.  

Ability to multitask and work under pressure.

Attention to detail, Dependable, Flexible, hard-working, punctual and a great team player

As far as weaknesses, I feel that my management skills could be stronger, and I am constantly working to improve them."

Highly adaptable to change


Tell me about yourself

Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 10 years?
What can you offer us that someone else can't?
What are three things your former manager would like you to improve on?
Are you willing to relocate?
Are you willing to travel?
Tell me about an accomplishment you are most proud of.
Tell me about a time you made a mistake.
What is your dream job?
How did you hear about this position?
What would you accomplish in the first 30/60/90 days on the job?
Discuss your resume.
Discuss your educational background.
Describe yourself.
Tell me how you handled a difficult situation.
Why should we hire you?
Would you work holidays/weekends?
How would you deal with an angry or irate customer?
What are your salary requirements?
Give a time when you went above and beyond the requirements for a project.
Who are our competitors?
What was your biggest failure?
What motivates you?
What’s your availability?
Who’s your mentor?
Tell me about a time when you disagreed with your boss.
How do you handle pressure?
What are your career goals?
What gets you up in the morning?
What were your bosses’ strengths/weaknesses?
If I called your boss right now and asked him what is an area that you could improve on, what would he say?
Are you a leader or a follower?
What was the last book you read for fun?
What are your co-worker pet peeves?
What are your hobbies?
What is your favourite website?
What makes you uncomfortable?
What are some of your leadership experiences?
How would you fire someone?
What do you like the most and least about working in this industry?
Would you work 40+ hours a week?
What questions haven’t I asked you?
What questions do you have for me?

What makes a good leader

http://www.visahunter.com/articles/how-to-answer-the-150-most-common-job-interview-questions/

  • What are the ten most common questions asked at graduate interviews?

 

At the University of Kent we asked students what questions they were asked at graduate selection interviews by a variety of employers and for a range of jobs. Whereas we doubt if this survey is very reliable it does give an idea of the key questions to watch out for, and to prepare answers to, at interview.

You can find an excellent inforgraphic of this page produced by Headway Recruitment here

Of course questions were sometimes asked in slightly different formats. For example,"Why do you want this job?" was sometimes phrased "Why do you want to be an accountant/social worker/journalist?"

1. Why do you want this job?

[pic 1]

One of the most predictable questions and very important! You need to demonstrate that you have researched the employer and tie your knowledge of them into the skills and interests that led you to apply. For example, an interviewee with a small public relations agency might say:

"I'm always ready to take on responsibility and feel this will come more quickly with a firm of this size. A small firm also gives the chance to build closer working relationships with clients and colleagues and I've found through my past work experience that this makes an organisation more effective as well as more satisfying to work in."

Try to find some specific feature on which the employer prides themselves: their training, their client base, their individuality, their public image, etc. This may not always be possible with very small organisations but you may be able to pick up something of this nature from the interviewer.

See our Commercial Awareness page for more help with this

2. Have you got any questions?

At the end of the interview, it is likely that you will be given the chance to put your own questions to the interviewer.

  • Keep them brief: there may be other interviewees waiting.
  • Ask about the work itself, training and career development: not about holidays, pensions, and season ticket loans!
  • Prepare some questions in advance: it is OK to write these down and to refer to your notes to remind yourself of what you wanted to ask.

It often happens that, during the interview, all the points that you had noted down to ask about will be covered before you get to this stage. In this situation, you can respond as follows:

Interviewer: Well, that seems to have covered everything: is there anything you would like to ask me?

Interviewee: Thank you: I'd made a note to ask about your appraisal system and the study arrangements for professional exams, but we went over those earlier and I really feel you've covered everything that I need to know at this moment.

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